Friday, April 11, 2014

Novi Sad - In Like a Lamb, Out Like a Lion

The outdoor tables on the main pedestrian street in Novi Sad were filled with shirt-sleeved locals well into the evening the day we arrived; however, the next day, Sun-Ling's birthday,  not even a single well-bundled person could be found sitting outside on the main drags. Of course folks were still strolling and biking.

Novi Sad, situated on the Danube about 90 minutes north of Belgrade by train, is known for its Art Nouveau architecture, rural monasteries in Fruška Gora National Park, and the Petrovaradin Fortress which guards the Danube.

For Sun-Ling's windy and chilly birthday we took a long hike (24 kms) stringing together 4 monasteries in Fruška Gora plus the town of Sremski Karlovci and then topping off the day with cake from a local pastry shop and a basket (sort of ) of french fries from Muchacho's.

Novi Sad Station. The train from Belgrade to Novi Sad was relaxing.
Novi Sad - Serbia

We were pleased to find Ananda Veggie, a vegan restaurant with a menu of the day, just a few blocks from city center.
Novi Sad - Serbia

Novi Sad - Serbia

The former Jewish Synagogue - Art Nouveau.
Novi Sad - Serbia

More Art Nouveau.
Novi Sad - Serbia

A Bauhaus building.
Novi Sad - Serbia

And another Bauhaus apartment.
Novi Sad - Serbia

Novi Sad - Serbia

And my favorite building in Novi Sad is this one; The White Banovina circa 1937. Quite the boat, eh?
Novi Sad, Serbia

Novi Sad, Serbia

Along the Danube a new bridge is under construction in the distance. Twin spans are being built on opposing riverbanks and will be positioned over the river when completed.
Novi Sad - Serbia

The Catholic Church.
Novi Sad - Serbia

Walking to Petrovaradin Fortress.
Novi Sad - Serbia

Novi Sad - Serbia

Novi Sad - Serbia

Novo Hopovo Monastery, Fruška Gora National Park.
Novi Sad, Serbia

Trail and blaze.
Novi Sad, Serbia

Stari Hopovo Monastery, Fruška Gora.
Novi Sad, Serbia

To Greteg Monastery.
Novi Sad, Serbia

Novi Sad, Serbia

Novi Sad, Serbia

Greteg Monastery where we were surprised to see three Serbian Orthodox nuns.
Novi Sad, Serbia

Velika Remeta Monastery.
Novi Sad, Serbia

Main Square - Sremski Karlovci.
Novi Sad, Serbia

Finally; Sun-Ling digging into her basket of takeout Muchaco fries. What a great place. It serves only french fries and beer. ;-)
Novi Sad, Serbia

Novi Sad, Serbia

7 comments:

Kathy said...

Happy Birthday!!!

Wow, you guys are SO energetic. Glad to see pix of the monasteries, though.

Crash Eddy said...

Happy birthday, Sun-Ling! Serbian fries and beer, what more could one ask for?

Sun-Ling said...

@Kathy, thanks! The monasteries were not that big a deal, considering after all that we have seen and those we are yet to see. We did spot a few orthodox nuns, a first for us.

The walk made it interesting. Not all the trails are marked on the GPS or maps, but there were many, many tracks, signs, blazes to navigate - it was like a treasure hunt.

Sun-Ling said...

@Ed, it was not a match for a birthday dinner at Downing's, not even close.

liz said...

Hi. I have been thinking about you. I hope you had a great birthday!!!

Sun-Ling said...

@Liz, I should have eaten more cake, especially after that hike. Everyday I walk by millions of pastry shops with gazillions of scrumptious treats. My excuse has come and gone, haha.

Sun-Ling said...

The Orthodox Church has a tradition of establishing monasteries in rural areas; less distraction, better for spirituality. Over the centuries all of them suffered much. Destruction and restoration is the rule rather than exception, most recently by NATO in the 1990s (for those in Fruska Gora), supposedly. In Fruska Gora, a good number of them are functioning monasteries. Three of the four we visited sold honey and probably other byproducts (I couldn't identify). In fact, Veliko Remeta had a huge beekeeping operation right next to their building https://flic.kr/p/nboyo9. At least one sold wine, but I was less certain of the provenance. At each, we saw very devout looking, I-would-even-call-them-pilgrims, very few in number, arrived in cars -- only us two atheists were on foot.