Thursday, December 09, 2010

Cajamarca is scrumptious

Very few places are comparable in historical significance as Cajamarca, Peru where the Spanish Conquistadors effectively ended Incan rule. It has tons of historic architecture, big-hatted indigenous people, and bustling vendors. What really got my attention is the amazing quantity of cheese, chocolate, pastries, and other treats, in addition to usual mountains of fruits and vegetables. It is totally my kind of place!

Some photos from Cajamarca, starting with architecture.

Hot Springs in Banos del Incas, just outside Cajamarca. It was here that the last Inca King Atahualpa rested before he was captured by Francisco Pizarro.

Hot Springs - Banos del Incas, Peru

Centro Cajamarca has narrow streets lined with old colonial buildings.
Cajamarca, Peru

Plaza de Armas with 17th century fountain.
Fountain - Cajamarca, Peru

Iglesias San Francisco.
Igelsia San Francisco - Cajamarca, Peru

Big-hatted lady spinning thread while walking in Plaza de Armas. At left is a gelatin vendor with wares in bucket. In back you can see part of a military ceremony.
Sombrero - Cajamarca, Peru

On the van to Otuzco.
Sombrero - Cajamarca, Peru

Typical street scene with big-hatted ladies and moto-taxi.
Ladies with Sombreros - Cajamarca, Peru

We bought some sweet chocolate balls from this street vendor. She's digging them out of the basket. She also sells disks of unsweetened cooking chocolate (in basket) and cheese (basket at right).
Chocolate Vendor - Cajamarca, Peru

Cheese shop.
Cheese Shop - Cajamarca, Peru

Cakeman and VW van.
Cake Man - Cajamarca, Peru

Mangoes are in season and 4 (or 5) can be bought for 1 New Peruvian Sol - about 35 cents US.
Mangoes - Cajamarca, Peru

Random colorful market shot. Not sure what those "sauces" are.
Mercado - Cajamarca, Peru

4 comments:

Crash Eddy said...

I'm sorta curious. How many photos would you have taken to select the best 12 to post?

Second Q. Are the indigenous people of Incan descent, Spanish, mixed blood of those two, other Indians?

john said...

Ed, I probably take 20 to 30 photos for every one photo I post; often more. That doesn't mean that all the non-posted shots are duds. Sometimes I'll have several great shots of the same subject, but only post one. And often the first shot of a subject is the one I post (the best), but I'll take many more trying to getting a better one but not succeeding. Great question. Thanks!

john said...

Ed, Regarding Q2, see this article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_peoples_in_Peru

Crash Eddy said...

Thanks for the reference, nice explanation. Crossed Bearing Strait in 9000 BC and took until 6000 BC to reach Peru, eh? >100 generations and they had no map. What long range planning, er, ah, happenstance.