Friday, April 24, 2015

Hangzhou Hiking - Part Three

Saturday, Sun-Ling's Uncle drove us to the base of Five Cloud Peak and walked with us north to Longjing (Dragon Well) Village, famous for its pan-roasted green tea. From there we headed south along the ancient road aptly named Nine Brooks and 18 Streams and then back to the car. About 11 kms walked.

It's a beautiful sunny Saturday morning and the path up to Five Cloud Peak is busy.
Hangzhou, China

Sun-Ling and Uncle review our route at the top of Five Cloud Peak.
Hangzhou, China

The three of us standing next to the symbolic cloud stone image at the top.
Hangzhou, China

Heading over to the Longjing tea plantations.
Hangzhou, China

April is prime season for picking tea leaves and the pickers were out in force with baskets, aprons and straw hats.
Hangzhou, China

Hangzhou, China

Hangzhou, China

Hangzhou, China

Walking the ridges and saddles.
Hangzhou, China

Hangzhou, China

Time for a lunch break with a view to Longjing Valley.
Hangzhou, China

The walk down is quick but scenic.
Hangzhou, China

A parade of workers returning to the fields from their lunch break.
Hangzhou, China

Hats, aprons and baskets.
Hangzhou, China

Down in Longjing (Dragon Well) Village one can see the freshly picked tea leaves first get aired dried and then pan-roasted. Then one can have a tasting before buying.
Hangzhou, China

Hangzhou, China

When we visited Longjing in 1991 the heat for the pan roasting was from a wood fire, today it's electric.
Hangzhou, China

These folks are tasting.
Hangzhou, China

Turn right at the end of the village and it's a pleasant walk south through more neatly terraced tea fields on the ancient path called Nine Brooks and 18 Streams.
Hangzhou, China

Uncle and Sun-Ling.
Hangzhou, China

Hangzhou, China

And bicyclists too.
Hangzhou, China

Hangzhou, China

Hangzhou, China








4 comments:

Lizzie said...

I enjoyed seeing pictures of the tea leaf pan roasting process. Interesting that the process has evolved from fire to electricity. I image the flavor is different with the absense of smoke.

Liz said...

Oops - auto-correct changed Liz to Lizzie (yuck!)

Crash Eddy said...

To follow on Lizzie's thought, so has the carbon footprint increased or decreased with the evolution from fire to electricity. I would think the losses in electricity transmission would make it the loser but there are too many factors in the equation.

john said...

Good points Ed and Liz. I don't have anything to add.