Saturday, March 03, 2018

Finally a relaxing day in Rome

We had planned a day of walking and the weather more or less cooperated.  We took the subway to see the aqueducts, then got over to the Appian way and followed the Via Francigena (the ancient route that in medieval times connected Canterbury to Rome) all the way back to the Colosseum.  After much reading about the catacombs of Rome, we finally checked it off at San Sebastiano. 

In the evening, it was neither frigid nor rainy, so we partook in the passeggiata, even happened upon an election relay in the Piazza del Popolo.

To get to the start of the day's walk in the Aqueducts Park, we rode the Metro about 10 stops SW to Lucio Sestio station on the outskirts of Rome.
Rome, Italy

One of the ancient aqueducts runs along a modern day golf course.
Rome, Italy

Rome, Italy

Then under the train tracks and along a muddy track (not shown) to the Appian Way.
Rome, Italy

According to wikipedia "The Appian Way was one of the earliest and strategically most important Roman roads of the ancient republic. It connected Rome to Brindisi, in southeast Italy".

Many mausoleums and tombs along the Appian Way.
Rome, Italy

Rome, Italy

About half-way back, we stopped at the Catacombs of San Sebastiano. No photos allowed in the catacombs, but here's a shot of St. Sebastiano's tomb.
Rome, Italy

We entered Rome through Porta San Sebastiano. Wow!
Rome, Italy

And were soon at the Arch of Constantine and the Colosseo. A sunny day and folks were enjoying Roma.
Rome, Italy

Rome, Italy

After a rest we headed out to walk the Corso down to Piazza Popolo and back via the Spanish Steps and Trevi Fountain.
Rome, Italy

Rome, Italy

Rome, Italy

Rome, Italy

And some gelato!
Rome, Italy

And finally a swing by the Roman Forum just before home.
Rome, Italy

Rome, Italy


2 comments:

Crash Eddy said...

I'm saying it's your experience with the wonders of the world that makes you appreciate them so much. Enjoying your visit with you.

john said...

@Crash - Thanks for reading! After the past few days, I realize I had *underestimated* the influence of the Greeks and Romans on our so-called Western Civilization.