Friday, February 22, 2013

Mexico City - Part I - Peacocks and Hairless Dogs

Returning to Mexico City after 9 years we wondered how the city had changed and how we had changed. Nine years ago we flew in from North Carolina, rode the Metro to Allende station and walked a few blocks north in the early evening to Hotel Habana. The sight of policeman with guns startled us as we walked up Rep├║blica de Chile to Rep├║blica de Cuba and it was a few days until we realized that in Mexico, policemen with guns is a sign of good security, not the reverse.

This time we bused in from Irapuato and rode the Metro to Allende and walked a few blocks south to Hotel Washington, just a few blocks from Hotel Habana. There were even more police with guns than in 2003, but after 4 weeks Mexico, we barely noticed - our new normal. A twist: Hotel Washington was unable to provide Internet as advertised, and after one night we moved to Hotel Cuba just one block from Hotel Habana.

Mexico City, called DF or simply Mexico by Mexicans was great. Plenty of vegetarian restaurants and more things to do than we could squeeze into 5.5 days. We'll be back for sure.

On our first full day, we headed south on the Metro, then the Tren Ligero (light rail line) to the Dolores Olmeda Museum. Lots of Diego Rivera paintings, not murals, a few Frida Kahlos (most were on loan to a traveling exhibition), more peacocks in one place than I've seen in my entire life combined, and a herd of hairless dogs.

Within an hour of our arrival in DF we were having a vegetarian meal with a view. Woohoo!
Mexico City, Mexico

The lobby of the Art Nouveau Gran Hotel.
Mexico City, Mexico

Cathedral with helicopter.
Mexico City, Mexico

The daily flag lowering on the zocalo made more difficult by high winds and temporary exhibition halls.
Mexico City, Mexico

Peacocks at the Dolores Olmeda Museum.
Mexico City, Mexico

Hairless dogs with imposter at the Olmeda.
Mexico City, Mexico

Tren Ligero pulls into La Noria station.
Mexico City, Mexico

Creation, a mural by Diego Rivera in the Anfiteatro Simon Bolivar.
Mexico City, Mexico

Los danzantes de Chalma, a mural by Fernando Leal at the College of San Ildefonso.
Mexico City, Mexico

And finally John with fish (painting by Pedro Diego Alvarado)
Mexico City, Mexico

2 comments:

Crash Eddy said...

I'm wondering if our Mexican immigration "problem" results from the Catholic Church having consumed so much labor over the years to construct all these cathedrals you're visiting and that has dried up. Encourage the CC to resume construction and put the locals to work.

john said...

Crash - Great topic for discussion when we see you next. We have some new perspectives.